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           Progress Monitoring

          This feature of RtI enables school teams to keep tabs on students' progress on a regular basis, and in an objective manner.


          Ongoing Progress Monitoring Helps Teams Answer Some Important Questions

          CBM: An Important Information-Gathering Strategy
                     






          Curriculum-Based Measurement


          Under RtI, school teams must use validated practices for progress monitoring, meaning that the methods used have been supported by scientific research. One approach to progress monitoring with approximately 30 years of scientific support is called Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM, or perhaps known in some schools as CBA, short for Curriculum-Based Assessment).

          CBM in a Nutshell

          Why Do It?


          The use of CBM is favored by many educators because it offers them a reliable and valid method for measuring student progress quickly and frequently, using a practical, easy to administer assessment protocol that is very sensitive to changes in student progress.
          By reviewing CBM data on a regular basis, school teams can determine exactly where individual students stand relative to their classmates and relative to established benchmarks, and they can make timely instructional decisions based on this information.